One of the most often questions we are asked is how our products compare to other digestive enzyme supplements. With so many products available, comparing apples to apples using the labeling units can get very confusing! First, let me just tell you that when you buy enzymes, the weight (usually listed in mg.) means nothing when comparing the activity units of the enzymes.  Quality enzyme products will use the standard FCC (Food Chemical Codex) units of measurement which establishes activity levels for the enzymes. But, there are even a few versions of these units so here’s a handy table to give you some approximate conversion factors.

Enzyme Name Common Labeling Units Conversion
Protease HUT, USP, SAP 1 HUT = approx. 6.5 USP
Amylase DU 1 DU = approx. 48 USP
Lipase FIP, LU, FCCLU 1FIP = approx. 2.5 LU/FCCLU No conversion available to USP

 

I’m always stunned when I see major national retail chains with products that list enzymes only in milligrams (mg) as this truly doesn’t tell the buyer anything about the potency of the enzymes, but metric weight is all that is legally required by the FDA for enzyme supplements. So, when you are selecting an enzyme product, you want to be sure to choose one that lists more than just the mg. and also compare the units of activity to the price. One product may have a higher price, but when you truly compare the activity units you may need to take 3 or 4 capsules of one product to equal the enzyme activity in 1 capsule of a competitor product.

The enzyme activity of  products should be measured and reported in FCC units.  These unit measurements are usually expressed as follows:

Protease – HUT (Hemoglobin Unit Tyrosine base), USP
Amylase – DU (Alpha-amylase Dextrinizing units)
Lipase – FIP, LU, FCCLU (LU= Lipase unit)
Cellulase – CU (Cellulase unit)
Invertase – IAU (Invertase Activity unit)
Lactase – LacU (Lactase unit)
Maltase – DP (degrees Diastatic power)

When comparing enzyme products make sure measurements are listed using FCC standard codes.  Some manufacturers make up their own abbreviations.  Others use weights such as milligrams (mgs).  Still others will list measurements based on dosage which may be more than one capsule.

Because of the variety of labeling formats used it is important to read carefully and make sure you are not comparing apples to oranges.

Another item to think about when choosing an enzyme product is “does the product contain fillers?” Many supplement products contain magnesium stearate, silica, rice bran, etc. to “fill-up” a standard sized capsule or to prevent caking or clumping. Enzyme Essentials tries to eliminate fillers whenever we can and all our capsules are sized for each product so we never need to add inactive ingredients to “fill” a capsule. Our philosophy is we don’t put ingredients you don’t need in our products.


38 Comments

  1. shel
    Posted September 19, 2014 at 5:38 pm | Permalink

    how do you convert FCC units to mg?

    • enzymelady
      Posted September 23, 2014 at 7:42 pm | Permalink

      Thanks for asking. FCC units cannot be converted because mg refers to the weight of the product and FCC units refer to the potency or activity of the product. They are not related.

  2. Barsha
    Posted January 11, 2015 at 7:49 am | Permalink

    How can we convert 200 mg of pancereatin RS USP to produce 8 USP of lipase activity per ml?

    • enzymelady
      Posted January 22, 2015 at 7:31 pm | Permalink

      There is no way to convert or compare pancreatin to lipase as they are 2 completely different enzyme products that work differently in your body. Pancreatin is made from ox or hog bile and lipase is plant based. And 200mg of an enzyme does not tell you about the activity units.

  3. Dennis Ferman
    Posted November 12, 2015 at 5:24 pm | Permalink

    Are FCC units the same as FCCLU units?
    If so, would 375 FCC = 150 FIP units typically be enough Lipase to digest fats?

  4. odette
    Posted November 28, 2015 at 4:36 pm | Permalink

    It can be converted.

    Example:

    Pancreatin 4 x contains:
    Lipase ……..no less than 8 USP/mg
    Protease……no less than 100 USP/mg
    Amylase……no less than 100 USP/mg

    With 1 HUT equaling approximately 6.5 USP you can do the math.

  5. odette
    Posted November 28, 2015 at 4:48 pm | Permalink
  6. Amanda Clara
    Posted February 1, 2017 at 2:21 am | Permalink

    would you please help me to explain the difference DU/g and DU only? Thank you very much

    • enzymelady
      Posted July 17, 2018 at 4:06 pm | Permalink

      There is no difference. DU is (Dextrinizing Unit)
      DU/g is (Dextrinizing Unit /gram) and if the product is listed in milligrams then it means the same.

  7. Gerri
    Posted April 6, 2017 at 6:21 pm | Permalink

    Very helpful information. Exactly what I needed to be able to compare brands, Thank you!

  8. jeff levinger
    Posted May 26, 2017 at 10:20 pm | Permalink

    unanswered mysteries:

    What’s a HUT?
    What’s a SAP?
    What’s a DU?
    What’s an FIP?
    What’s an LU?
    What’s an FCCLU?

    • enzymelady
      Posted January 2, 2018 at 8:05 pm | Permalink

      The enzyme activity of products should be measured and reported in FCC units. These unit measurements are usually expressed as follows:

      Protease – HUT (Hemoglobin Unit Tyrosine base), USP

      Amylase – DU (Alpha-amylase Dextrinizing units)

      Lipase – FIP, LU, FCCLU

      Cellulase – CU (Cellulase unit)

      Invertase – IAU (Invertase Activity unit)

      Lactase – LacU (Lactase unit)

      Maltase – DP (degrees Diastatic power)

      When comparing enzyme products make sure measurements are listed using FCC standard codes. Some manufacturers make up their own abbreviations. Others use weights such as milligrams (mgs). Still others will list measurements based on dosage which may be more than one capsule.

  9. Siva
    Posted May 30, 2017 at 9:54 pm | Permalink

    Hi, what would be the conversion of the following UNITS to mg. roughly

    1 USP unit of Lipase:___________mg
    1 USP unit of Amylase:___________mg
    1 USP unit of Protease:___________mg

    Thanks,

    • enzymelady
      Posted January 2, 2018 at 8:11 pm | Permalink

      Most food comparisons are based on weight. With enzymes the key measurement is the unit of activity and potency. There is no direct relationship between weight and units of activity. So beware a product that lists enzymes only in mg. This doesn’t tell you the actual activity level of the enzymes.

  10. Lynn De Vaney
    Posted July 10, 2017 at 1:32 am | Permalink

    Okay, so what do these acronym actually stand for? FIP, DU, HUT, SAPU, USP, CU, AsGU, BGU, GalU, XU, DP, LU, FCCLU and CFU? Where i there a list?

    • enzymelady
      Posted January 2, 2018 at 8:10 pm | Permalink

      The enzyme activity of products should be measured and reported in FCC units. These unit measurements are usually expressed as follows:

      Protease – HUT (Hemoglobin Unit Tyrosine base), USP

      Amylase – DU (Alpha-amylase Dextrinizing units)

      Lipase – FIP, LU, FCCLU

      Cellulase – CU (Cellulase unit)

      Invertase – IAU (Invertase Activity unit)

      Lactase – LacU (Lactase unit)

      Maltase – DP (degrees Diastatic power)

      When comparing enzyme products make sure measurements are listed using FCC standard codes. Some manufacturers make up their own abbreviations. Others use weights such as milligrams (mgs). Still others will list measurements based on dosage which may be more than one capsule.

  11. Joe
    Posted August 25, 2017 at 4:51 pm | Permalink

    What about comparing the potential effectiveness of an enzyme product capsule containing 300 GalU of Alpha-Galactosidase vs. a capsule containing a blend of 7 different enzymes, including Protease 12400 HUT down to Lactase 166 LacU?

    • enzymelady
      Posted January 2, 2018 at 8:10 pm | Permalink

      There’s really no way to compare 1 type of enzyme to a blend. All the enzymes work on different substrates in your food (starch, dairy, protein, etc.) and so each has its own purpose. The best thing is to take a quality blend of enzymes with a meal and see if you notice the difference. Some products work better for others so we suggest finding a high quality brand with no fillers and trying it. Our Digest 90 and DigestZyme are both excellent choices.

  12. Marilyn Stouffer
    Posted September 16, 2017 at 9:46 pm | Permalink

    where do yo find the activity level on the bottle?and do they all list it?

    • enzymelady
      Posted January 2, 2018 at 7:52 pm | Permalink

      All quality supplements should list the ingredients in the supplement box. Activity units can be measured in a lot of ways, so you may just need to convert some using this chart or others you find on the web.

  13. Denis
    Posted November 24, 2017 at 1:24 am | Permalink

    If I take 15,000 USD units of amylase what does that convert to in European units. And is it different for the other enzymes in the pancreatic enzymes

    • enzymelady
      Posted January 2, 2018 at 8:07 pm | Permalink

      I don’t think there is a difference between US and European units. The enzyme activity of products should be measured and reported in FCC units. These unit measurements are usually expressed as follows:

      Protease – HUT (Hemoglobin Unit Tyrosine base), USP

      Amylase – DU (Alpha-amylase Dextrinizing units)

      Lipase – FIP, LU, FCCLU

      Cellulase – CU (Cellulase unit)

      Invertase – IAU (Invertase Activity unit)

      Lactase – LacU (Lactase unit)

      Maltase – DP (degrees Diastatic power)

      When comparing enzyme products make sure measurements are listed using FCC standard codes. Some manufacturers make up their own abbreviations. Others use weights such as milligrams (mgs). Still others will list measurements based on dosage which may be more than one capsule.

  14. George
    Posted November 30, 2017 at 6:45 pm | Permalink

    How can I convert 4*USP of pancreatin into Ug of trypsin?

    • enzymelady
      Posted January 2, 2018 at 8:06 pm | Permalink

      Our products don’t contain pancreatin so I don’t have any information about this type of conversion.

  15. brian linforth
    Posted December 5, 2017 at 8:59 am | Permalink

    are all Bromelain powder products sold on the basis of GDU/g of powder or GDU/g of Protien?

    • enzymelady
      Posted January 2, 2018 at 7:50 pm | Permalink

      Since the FCC regulates enzyme supplements, the issue is that manufacturers can list in a variety of measurements and it’s not as exact as a prescription drug. We list as PU (papain units), but others list as GDU (gelatin digestion units). I would just search on comparing PU to GDU and you will likely find a few sites that will give some conversion rates. Since we don’t use GDU then I don’t have a conversion for you. I’m sorry!

  16. Thingsmac
    Posted January 26, 2018 at 2:32 am | Permalink

    OK- here’s the golden question: how many FIP of lipase does it take to digest 1g of fat?
    There must be a chart out there somewhere with info on how much enzymes it takes to digest X amount of the respective macronutrient, no?

    • enzymelady
      Posted January 29, 2018 at 7:15 pm | Permalink

      Lipase does not work like that. It is a digestive enzyme and it digests the fat that you consume. There is no conversion for the amount of FIP it would take to digest a gram of fat. Enzymes are based on activity, the body uses them as it needs. The more activity the more times the body can use it for different things.

      There are over 7000 FIP’s in our Digest and that is more than enough to provide the body with what it needs to digest the fat in a meal properly. If you are on a high fat diet, like keto, you may require 2 digest each time you eat. You need to listen to your body and how you are feeling. If you feel a little discomfort after a high fat meal, then you might try taking another Digest. Or you can combine Digest and LypoZyme to give a boost in lipase enzymes.

      We can’t pin point it for each person because we don’t know how your gallbladder is working.

  17. Posted February 21, 2018 at 5:10 am | Permalink

    Please give how much kilogram each product required to make 1 lakh capsule
    Catalase 25 U, (2.5 Mg)
    Protease 5565 HUT,
    Acid Stable Protease 9 SAPU,
    Peptidase 36 HUT,
    Amylase 843 SKB,
    Lipase 186 FIP,
    Cellulase 111 CU,
    Lactase 20 ALU,
    Beta Glucanase 2 BG,
    GlucoAmylase 2 AG,
    Hemicellulase 28 HCU,
    Invertase 28 SU,
    Phytase 0.5 U,
    Pectinase 2.5 ENDO PG,
    Mineral Blend 12.5 MG

    • enzymelady
      Posted February 27, 2018 at 4:44 pm | Permalink

      This is not information we can provide. If you have a specific product question, we are happy to help.

  18. Trudy O’Gorman
    Posted February 26, 2018 at 4:13 pm | Permalink

    What is the difference of the measure FTU of digestive enzyme Phytase on supplement labels and other types of measures of other enzymes? As I understand this enzyme breaks down phytates in foods which block absorption of iodine, zinc, iron and other minerals and vitamins.

    • enzymelady
      Posted February 27, 2018 at 4:55 pm | Permalink

      Correct. Each enzyme has its own activity unit associated with it. Protease is HUT, Lipase is FIP, etc. and so the activity unit for Phytase is FTU. So when comparing enzyme products, you want to compare the activity units and not milligrams. Our Digest product contains 42 FTU of Phytase. If you want to compare products, you need to look at this number in FTU to compare the activity level of the enzymes.

  19. Camilla
    Posted March 8, 2018 at 5:56 pm | Permalink

    Product 1:

    Pancreatin (as protease activity), porcine = 75,000 USP Units
    Papain Carica papaya (fruit) = 2,900,000 PU
    Bromelain Ananas comosus (stem) = 324 GDU
    Trypsin, porcine = 180,000 USP Units
    Chymotrypsin, porcine = 22,500 USP Units
    Rutin = 150 mg

    Product 2:

    Amylase = 32,500 USP units
    Protease (trypsin & chymotrypsin) = 32,500 USP units
    Lipase (pancreatic lipase) = 2,600 USP units
    Glutamic Acid HCI = 200 mg
    Acidophilus (Lactobacillus, Bulgaricus, Bifidus) = 150 mg
    Ox Bile = 120 mg
    Bromelain (1:10) (from pineapple) = 100 mg
    Pepsin NF (1:15,000) = 65 mg
    Papain (from papaya) = 65 mg
    Malt Diastase = 65 mg
    Cellulase = 20 mg
    Hemicellulase = 5 mg
    Lactase = 5 mg

    Which one is better, stronger?

    Thank you

    • enzymelady
      Posted July 17, 2018 at 4:09 pm | Permalink

      I can’t really comment on other products. You can use our table to convert formulas from USP but you want to use a product that works best for your body and digestive system. Both of these contain animal enzymes made from ox bile or hog bile while all of our products are plant-based and work throughout the entire digestive system.
      https://www.enzymeessentials.com/HTML/plant_enzyme_benefits.html

  20. Deana Rautenbach
    Posted May 3, 2018 at 9:03 pm | Permalink

    Hi, a client of mine just picked up a product with the enzyme activities listed in Ph Eur units. Is this unit of measure comparable to the standard USP. In South Africa we generally use the Standard International Unit. I know your products are not listed in Ph Eur but please could you answer from a pharmacological viewpoint

  21. Benny
    Posted May 29, 2018 at 7:33 pm | Permalink

    I have a supplement that posts all of its enzyme activity as FCC. It does not matter what enzyme they are talking about, all the activity is listed as FCC. Example: protease 20,000 FCC, Lipase 375 FCC, amylase 630 FCC. It makes it confusing! Is this the same as HUT? Thanks for any info. By the way your enzymes look amazing. Will try!

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